top of page

Hot Weather Tips and Signs of Heat Stroke in Pets


When it's hot out please leave your pet at home while doing errands. Parking in the shade or leaving a window cracked open is not enough.
Hot Temperatures Infographic

When it is hot outside temperatures can quickly get intolerable inside your vehicle. To keep your pet safe it is best to leave them at home when you go out to do errands. Even if you think you will be only a few minutes it only takes 10 minutes for temperatures in your vehicle to become dangerous for your pet.


Even if the temperature is a moderate 21 degrees Celcius out it only takes 20 minutes for your vehicle to get to 37 degrees inside.


Parking in the shade or leaving a window cracked open is just not enough to protect your pet.



Signs of Heat Stroke in pets: Excessive panting Gasping for air Vomiting Foam around the mouth Bright red gums (or may turn blue) Dehydration and unable to drink Loss of consciousness
Signs of Heat Stroke Infographic

If your pet appears to be in distress, particularly when it is hot out, watch out for the signs of heat stroke:


  • Excessive panting

  • Gasping for air

  • Vomiting

  • Foaming around the mouth

  • Bright red gums (or may turn blue)

  • Dehydration and unable to drink

  • Loss of consciousness


This is life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention.



What to do if your pet may have heat stroke: Move to a cooler area (a shady grassy area or indoors with a cool fan on).  Use lukewarm/room temperature water (NOT cold water or ice) to cool down the paws, armpits, groin and belly.  Wipe rubbing alcohol or witch hazel onto the inner ear flap and paw pads. Use a dropper to give the pet a little dribble of water. Do not force them to drink as they could aspirate fluid into their lungs.
What to do for Heat Stroke Infographic

It is important to act fast and get to the Vet as quickly as possible for treatment. But here are some critical steps to follow while you prepare to go to your Vet:

  1. Move to a cooler area, either a shady grassy area or indoors with a cool fan on.

  2. Use lukewarm/room temperature water (NOT cold water or ice) to cool down the paws, armpits, groin and belly.

  3. Wipe rubbing alcohol or witch hazel onto the inner ear flap and paw pads.

  4. Use a dropper to gently give the pet a little dribble of water. Do not force them to drink as they could aspirate fluid into their lungs.


Follow @furryornot on Instagram and Facebook.

Our last post for Pet First Aid Awareness Month on how to make your own First Aid Kit:

2 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Archive: Hearing Our Pets 2021

I enjoy learning about animals and hope you do too. The important take-away I want to point out is that because animals have different abilities from us, in this case a range of hearing, we can learn

Archive: How to Approach a Pet Like a Pro 2021

I recently posted a series of Pet Care Tips on Social Media about how to approach a pet and set them at ease. It comes up a lot but I had a few interactions over the past month that made me think it w

Commentaires


Furryornot Petcare Logo and tagline
Serving Abbotsford
and Mission since 2011
bottom of page